Samoa rugby manager fined 100 pigs for World Cup bad behaviour

November 22, 2011
Posted by
Samoan rugby team manager Tuala Matthew Vaea has reportedly been fined 100 pigs by his village following allegations of bad behaviour at the Rugby World Cup.
Samoa captain Mahonri Schwalger complaine to his country's prime minister about the behaviour of rugby officials at the World Cup.Samoa captain Mahonri Schwalger complained to his country’s prime minister about the behaviour of rugby officials at the World Cup.

Leauva’a village chief Sala Lose told the New Zealand Heraldnewspaper the fine, worth around $NZ2500 ($A1900), was imposed because allegations made by Samoa captain Mahonri Schwalger had tarnished the chiefly title bestowed on Vaea.

Schwalger complained in a letter to Samoa Prime Minister Tuilaepa Aiono Sailele Malielegaoi that Vaea and other senior Samoa Rugby Union officials treated the World Cup as a holiday, were often absent from the team and spent much of the tournament drinking with friends.

Vaea, who is no longer team manager, was not available for comment.

AP

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/rugby-union/union-news/samoa-rugby-manager-fined-100-pigs-for-world-cup-bad-behaviour-20111122-1nrrz.html#ixzz1ePt8Gpqy

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84 Comments

  1. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 9:26 am

    Total lack of news hence this post… funny because it’s ‘true’… some humour on ‘Black Tuesday’!

  2. avatar Jacques(Bunny) says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 9:26 am

    That’s alot of Bacon :whistling:

  3. avatar DavidS says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 9:52 am

    Black Tuesday…

    I suspect the media is about to find out that a lot less people give a f++k abou them than what they think…

  4. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 10:20 am

    Reply to DavidS @ 9:52 am:

    ████ ██ █ ████ everything ███ ███ is███████ ████ fine. ████ ███ love, ███████ ███ your █████ ████ government.

  5. avatar DavidS says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 10:46 am

    Are they long pigs or normal ones…

    Just asking…

  6. avatar DavidS says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 10:48 am

    Ja but what’s the difference between them giving their shareholders’ opinion and giving the government’s?

    In both cases the nature and spin on the news is determined not by ideals of truth and free exchange of all ideas but on forcing people who read their crap to think in a certain way…

  7. avatar DavidS says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 10:50 am

    The way I write I don’t pretend to be anything more than an opinionated knowitall.

    The mainstream media however are opinionated knowitalls all pretending to be champions of justice and truth when they are slaves to the whims of shareholders and advertizers…

  8. avatar DavidS says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 10:50 am

    How did you do those blackout thingies? That was cool!

  9. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 10:53 am

    Hehe, kak funny this.

  10. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 11:24 am

    Reply to DavidS @ 10:48 am:

    You want the Mail&Guardian (et al) to stop their in-depth expose’s and forensics… media’s the only real avenue keeping the bastards honest (well attempting to)… everything else is trivial really…

    Reply to DavidS @ 10:50 am:

    Hehe… a cut and paste from some-ones’ FB status along with ‘editing’ rights on this article… wish I knew…

  11. avatar its a 15 man game - embrace it! says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 12:23 pm

    Thomas Jefferson wrote:

    “If I have to choose between government without newspapers and newspapers without government, I wouldn’t hesitate to choose the latter.”

    I cannot agree more.

    In this day and age – with all the knowledge available mostly for free, people are more equipped than ever to govern themselves.

    The disconnect between politicians and those who elect them are also wider than ever.

  12. avatar Timeo says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 3:27 pm

    Reply to DavidS @ 10:48 am:

    The difference is that there is only one government vs. a number of media companies, so you don’t get a monopoly on information.

    You may choose to ignore private media but the only the government can legally force you to listen.

  13. avatar Timeo says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 3:34 pm

    Reply to its a 15 man game – embrace it! @ 12:23 pm:

    Here is the USA especially, the politicians do what they do in order to get elected. Sensible policies, the truth, straight answers, are the fastest way to lose your job.

    No disconnect. Unfortunately, this seems to be what the voters want right now.

  14. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 4:04 pm

    In a country governed by the ANC and all it’s corruption it’s beyond reason that people can be so nonchalant about legislation being passed enabling the outlaw of whistle-blowing and investigative journalism!

  15. avatar DavidS says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 5:03 pm

    Not all that different to media houses in the UK, Aus and US at all. In any case the consolidation of media has reduced the numbers of media houses to such an extent that the idea of a really independent media is bunk.

    Bryce

    The arms deal investigation which the media loves to trumpet so much was the result of Andrew Feinstein and Patricia De Lille and had nothing to do with the Johnny Come Lately media.

    Know the Potgieter massacre? Nope… that’s because the media has not written much about it.

    How about the Walkerville Massacre? Yet again… fokkol

    I love to use the example of the Eugene Terreblanche murder. I attended a course on “bush symbology” once where it was taught to us that black people who kill enemies will often defecate on the enemy after killing him. The first conclusion the media drew when they were told semen was found on Terreblanche’s corpse was that he had bonked the two killers (the now deservedly UNrespected Sunday Independent said those exact words!)… and the “Terreblanche screwed k**fers!” Heeheeheehee glee came from a single report of “We found semen on the florr near the corpse report by the police. When the killers strongly denied having sex with him in their bail hearing the media never corrected their claims of Terreblanche’s homosexuality but rather left those contentions in the public mind…

    The media is a corrupt little chattel of advertizing and shareholder whoredom in the name of something good that has been corrupted. Much like the legal profession.

    To uphold the existing media as something to admire as an arm of justice fighting for freedom is to worship a pile of shit because it may become fertilizer.

  16. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 6:44 pm

    Dawie still does not grasp what
    the new Info Bill is about.
    :Rule 9:
    It’s about NOT reporting on the ANC’s
    corruption, mismanagement, scandalls
    etc. WITHOUT its permission.

    But hey, our clever boy is in step -
    all the other stakeholders, thinking
    public and the opposition is out of step.

    Kan nie onthou dat ek ‘n blogger al
    ‘n poephol genoem het nie, maar die
    versoeking is groot . . .

  17. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 7:08 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 6:44 pm:

    Dawie has a point, and I am not for this Bill in any way.

    The media is not covering themselves in glory are they? And they are governed by who? Press ombudsman? Who else?

    Now I can only relate this to sports journalism, and my feelings on this is well known. It is also interesting reading Dan Retief’s views on SuperSport the (not so) independent media houses Dawie is referring to – and then let’s not even start on the Media24 group the owners of that infamous (now) tabloid called the Rapport newspaper.

    My personal view on sports journalism is that the majority of these individuals (and their companies) are irresponsible (and that is putting it kindly).

    Since we started this blog we have been personally exposed to this every single year almost – it has also been said to me in private by a journalist that he hates us for the fact that we do not have to toe-the-line of any boss and say things we want to say without fear of losing a job or being censored by your own bosses.

    The right for people ‘to know’ remains a fundamental cornerstone of society – but I fear the institutions responsible for this has become as institutionalized as the government itself.

  18. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 7:29 pm

    This is not about toeing the line – which
    you find in each and every business institution.

    This is about a government under all kinds
    of pressure wanting to keep their dismeanors
    away from public consumption.

  19. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 7:31 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 7:08 pm:

    The Press Ombudsman is open to all
    complaints from anybody about the
    contents of any paper.

  20. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 7:40 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 7:29 pm:

    Well it comes down to the same thing.

    You are asking one party to be responsible (government) and eradicate corruption but the other (media) can do as it please?

    Dawie highlighted a couple of examples above – I can do the same from a sports and rugby perspective where journalism was not only irresponsible but downright vindictive.

    Look at what is currently being investigated in the UK – the power of the media and to what extent they will go to to sell newspapers…

    The very thing we accuse government of (self-enrichment, self-preservation) can easily be levelled at the media as-well.

    The public does have a right to know, but from personal experience in rugby this right is abused by the media where the truth is often twisted to either suite an agenda, or simple sensationalism to get hits or sell papers and ads.

  21. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 7:40 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 7:31 pm:

    Who is currently running that show? Who is the guy in charge?

  22. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 8:01 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 7:40 pm:

    I think it is still the very distinguished
    Joe Thloloe, appointed in 2007.

    Check this page and see all the complaints
    they have attended to in the left sidebar.

    http://www.presscouncil.org.za/

    The resposible press is conducted within
    a very specific law against lible.
    I know of a hell of a lot of BIG SCOOPS
    there were not published at the time,
    but later confirmed.

    With the Angolan war and Soweto
    in 1976 there was a clampdown from the NP
    goverment – and nobody wanted to volunteer
    for jail.

    With the current bill any whistleblower in
    any govt department can be jailed for 25
    years.
    It’s a way to keep all kinds of corruption
    under the hat – in the name of state security.
    Eskom, Telkom, Land Bank whatever, also the
    extravagant waste of money by ministers and
    those connected.
    Another name for “keep the ANC in power.

  23. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 8:14 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 8:01 pm:

    Joe Thloloe is a journalist by trade as far as I can tell – and the criticism levelled at the ANC of the ‘state only being responsible to the state itself’ might well apply here too.

    How well defined is this ‘state security’ clause? I am asking because I honestly do not know. When can they pull our the ‘state security’ excuse to censor? When it is a matter of national/state security or just when they feel like it?

    If it is the latter, then surely this can be challenged in court and it will be too I would imagine.

    All countries, all governments have a level of national security which is important – if this is what the ANC is after then I do not have a problem with it really – but as mentioned, I don’t know what currently defines ‘state security’ according to this bill.

    Courts still supersede government in this country where this sort of thing can be challenged.

    I am getting the distinct feeling right now however that the media is busy blowing all of this out of proportion.

  24. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 8:39 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 8:14 pm:

    I am getting the distinct feeling right now however that the media is busy blowing all of this out of proportion.
    ——-
    I can only tell you you are wrong.
    Maybe you should just brush up on
    the subject by buying a paper tomorrow
    - like you should have done today :wink:
    Check News24 in the mean time.

  25. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 8:50 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 8:39 pm:

    You are asking me to trust the very sources I am sceptical of without giving me an answer to my most important question in my previous post.

    How well defined is this ‘state security’ clause? and when can they pull this clause out to ‘hide corruption’? And furthermore can it not be challenged in court if and when it is pulled out?

  26. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 8:52 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 8:39 pm:

    I have followed this whole story for a while now – including keeping an eye on IOL and News24 websites not mentioning The Times who was in shit recently.

    Still not convinced. For me it’s just way too easy blaming the ANC for this without about 99% (including myself) not knowing the actual facts.

  27. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 8:53 pm

    I mean to be jailed for up to 25 years you have to be found guilty of something in a court of law first.

  28. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 9:24 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 8:53 pm:

    The law more or less prescribes to
    the judge what the sentence should
    be.

    I would think they can pull out this
    clause whenever they deem it necessary –
    like the old NP did.

    Why do you think tne ANC is trying its
    utmost to “transform” the judiciary.
    To have more blacks, or to have more
    people adhering to their idiology?

    How dit Mogoeng Mogoeng get to be the
    chief judge – appointed over the head
    of several judges with much more
    experience? How come Joe Hlophe is
    still there?

    Ditto the new chief of police.
    And you know what has happened to the
    chiefs that preceded him:
    Selebi and Cele.
    The MEDIA in the end forced the hand of
    the ANC to do a very rare thing:
    fire people.
    Because they were both exposed as cheap
    crooks.
    Add Bomber McBride – another exposé.

    The ANC knows its most effective opposition
    comes from the media, who exposes its
    corruption.

  29. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 9:24 pm:

    But we have something called a constitution in this country. And constitutional rights.

    No judge or government is beyond the reach of this.

    The constitution is clearly defined – this new ‘bill’ from what I read not.

    Already we have seen government policies challenged and beaten in court (BEE appointments) because of constitutional laws and rights.

    Up and till the ANC re-writes the constitution of this country I do not see much fuss.

  30. avatar Morné says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    Must be off now, chat tomorrow.

  31. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 22nd, 2011 at 9:35 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 9:29 pm:

    But we have something called a constitution in this country.
    —-
    Exactly why this bill will now go
    to the Council of Provinces, and then
    the Constitutional Court – as I
    understand it.

    Stae security:
    Buying the same weapons from eg. Sweden
    at double the price offered by eg. Germany
    - and then being exposed, together with
    the bribe – can be classified as
    “state security”.

  32. avatar DavidS says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 11:08 am

    Reply to Morné @ 7:08 pm:

    Morne I agree 100% with you.

    Boertjie don’t make the mistake that I oppose the free movement of information.

    My issue is that the champions of that “right” are not really a good example of what champions should be. In truth my opinion is simply that the big media houses do not deserve the right to freedom of expression because they have shown themselves singularly incapable of treating that privilege with responsibility.

    It’s more about gleefully exposing Joost’s torn Polo underpants than telling us about the black on white racial hatred nature inherent of violent crime in South Africa. Nobody will ever mention that elephant in the room. That means that the media houses ARE ruled by fear of what their words may elicit already.

    What happened to David Bullard is a classic example of why the media does not deserve the right to freely express itself.

    _____________________________________________________________________

    The arms deal as I said as not exposed by the media but by an ANC member of parliament called Andrew Feinsten, who wrote an expose book tat THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA IGNORED until then PAC MP Patricia De Lille blasted the can of worms open in public.

    Do you understand what I am saying?

    I am opposed to this bill and virulently so. This bill is aimed precisely at silencing the likes of Feinstein before he can make disclosures to the public.

    However the right of the media to write about “Son screws another dog of mother’s” or “Terreblanche bonked blacks” or “Joost screws whores” is not something worthy of any protection. And I’ve been on the wrong end of seeing that happen many times. How stories are twisted to sell papers and make advertizers happy. I have even seen newspaper ad execs threaten companies with negative publicity should they not contribute to an industry wide advertortial that the newspaper wants sponsorship for… effectively extortion.

    My wife was once offered a bribe by a newspaper for medical records of a high profile politician her company covered.

    If that deserves protection then I am sorry I’d rather live in the old apartheid state with blank pages than in a society like that.

    Protect freedom of speech by all means, but then subject the media to the same scrutiny as the rest of us.

  33. avatar DavidS says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 11:38 am

    The new draft law contains a clause that allows for information to be exposed “in public interest” with a tribunal of government, media and judges to determine whether the information should be released or not.

    The difference here is they do not want a whistleblower who goes to the media to say that we spent too much money buying German instead of Spanish corvettes (you never read that in the media did you? Read Feinstein’s book to see where we lost the most money.) but rather in case some vindictive Islamic f**k goes to Saudi and tells them we have developed a way to process raw oil out of stones found only in the Kalahari… or say we’re in a conflict with our neighbours and some vindictive anti war long haired peace and love hippy white liberal goes to The M&G and tells them we’re planning a pre-emptive strike on Zimbabwe and they blow the story open and 5000 of our soldiers die so they could run a scoop (Don’t laugh! In 1996 the whole of Central Africa was fighting the biggest war ever in the continent’s history and the media kept dead silent about it!)

  34. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 12:05 pm

    The media in general gives a stuff about reporting right and wrong, it’s all comes down to the least work for the most sales.

    Reporting hard hitting truth is too much hard work and too risky in losing money and face in the aftershocks.

  35. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 12:07 pm

    Reply to DavidS @ 11:38 am:

    Yup – basically what I was asking. I cannot think with our constitution (which is viewed worldwide as one of the best) would allow any government to kill freedom of speech – that is one of the cornerstones around which the constitution is built!

    As mentioned above the media in general are given way too much freedom publishing what they want, and if it is found to be incorrect no apology or some apology so quickly washed away we hardly notice it. But we remember the ‘breaking news story’ because it is made headline news for days on end and is ingrained in the public mind – i.e. damage has been done.

    I am all for the media acting with more responsibility than what they currently are. I have said it before and will again – they have immense power over the average citizen and abuse that power too often.

  36. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 12:05 pm:

    But their argument now is centered around ‘the truth’ and how they will not be able to ‘report’ that anymore…

    A review of Dan Retief’s book will be up soon on this site – there is a section dedicated to SuperSport…

    It will give some of you an idea of why I say the media is abusing its powers.

  37. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 12:27 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 12:10 pm:

    From what I have seen they only report the “truth” when and in a way that is self serving. The media is also a political beast with the agenda’s structured accordingly.

  38. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 12:30 pm

    Or as Orwell puts it:

    War is Peace
    Freedom is Slavery
    Ignorance is Strength

    “The Party seeks power entirely for its own sake. We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power……We know that no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it. Power is not a means; it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power.”

  39. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 12:30 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 12:27 pm:

    Yup – I agree.

  40. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    Morné, on a different topic, are you or anybody else here connected to any rugby training facilities, e.g. the FSSI

  41. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:02 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 12:55 pm:

    Mate I reckon Dr. Ross Tucker is the perfect guy to talk to. Good friend of this site. This is his website http://www.sportsscientists.com/

    If you don’t get anywhere let me know I have contact details for him.

  42. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:11 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 1:02 pm:

    Thanks, but not quite what I had in mind. Every year we try and send a 2 – 5 players from the club here to SA for a few weeks to a training facility for rugby. For example, to a university or club that is linked to a training institute wit he idea that the guys get a chance to train and play at a higher level with a introduction to the science behind rugby and of course get emerged in a rugby culture.

    They are often students here so cost is an issue, hence the institute of Zondag is out.

    We sent 2 down last year for about €1500 for 6 weeks and they were put up in a university hostel and joined the koshuis team.

  43. avatar DavidS says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:15 pm

    This is excellent display of what the Nanny State is all about for those who want us to be Canada or Australia or worse…. the UK

    Nanny State

  44. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:16 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 1:11 pm:

    Ollie

    This sounds like a praiseworthy venture!

    Why not try the Tucker way – he is very
    well connected AFAIK.

    Only problem is koshuise everywhere are
    bursting at their seams, unless it coincides
    with a holiday.

    Dunno if PietPloos can assist from Stellenbosch.
    Where at least they will also get a bit of
    culture, not only rugby culture.
    :wink:

  45. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:19 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 1:16 pm:

    Suppose I should all the strings I can get my hands on :lol:

  46. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:19 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 1:11 pm:

    Still, get in touch with Ross – he works with these institutions on a daily basis mate and will be able to advise on the best options available to you.

    Brenden might also know someone in Cheetahs Rugby Union that could help you.

    I used to know someone at Tuks High Performance center but no more unfortunately.

  47. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:20 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 1:19 pm:

    Make that:

    Suppose I should pull all the strings I can get my hands on

  48. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:21 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 1:19 pm:

    Ok, thanks. We sent the guys to the Cheetahs this year, the current coach of the team has a contact there but doesn’t want to abuse it by sending too many to one place.

  49. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:22 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 1:16 pm: Reply to Ollie @ 1:19 pm:

    Ja Pietploos is also a good oke to contact, as is Brenden. I can get you in touch with Vlok from the Bulls (they do a bunch of clinics but mainly focused on kicking only).

    My first suggestion would remain Ross though.

  50. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:24 pm

    At least some ANC’s sees it in another
    light than what is motivated on this
    thread:

    One of the ANC’s leading free thinkers, Professor Ben Turok, a veteran who played a big part in the writing of the 1955 Freedom Charter, slipped out of the National Assembly as voting time approached.

    It is well known that Turok was feeling torn between party loyalty and his conscience about the content of the bill. Evidently conscience won.

    Someone who became ill in the course of the day was ANC MP Salamuddi Abram, a known advocate of freedom of speech.

    Another advocate of freedom of speech, Vytjie Mentor, was not present at the voting.

  51. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:33 pm

    Reply to DavidS @ 11:38 am:

    “The new draft law contains a clause that allows for information to be exposed “in public interest”
    ——-
    Beeld’s take on that statement, and Beeld is not
    alone:

    Die drakoniese strawwe in die wetgewing, die afwesigheid van ’n openbare-belang-verweer en die feit dat die blote besit van selfs ongepubliseerde geklassifiseerde inligting strafbaar is met besonder lang termyne tronkstraf maak dit ’n instrument van intimidasie.

  52. avatar DavidS says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 1:16 pm:

    The kind that lies on its back and spreads its legs and says “Ja Ja Ja Ja!” with you between them or the kind that sees you crawl into your koshuis kamer at 02h00 in the morning and wake up the next morning genuinely wanting the Reaper to fetch you?

    :twisted:

  53. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:40 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 12:07 pm:

    “I cannot think with our constitution (which is viewed worldwide as one of the best) would allow any government to kill freedom of speech – that is one of the cornerstones around which the constitution is built!”
    —-
    Then you don’t know the power hungry agenda
    and ideology of the ANC.
    A constituion is a piece of paper and can be
    changed with a 2/3 majority.
    It’s value is the same as the Freedom Charter
    - and do you see anything in that paper
    being implemented?

    Mandela voiced his opposition to this law.
    Cosatu is against the passing of this law.

    Liberia has (had?) the exact same constitution
    as the USA. Even their flag is a miniature US flag.
    Geddit?

  54. avatar DavidS says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:51 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 1:33 pm:

    You see the lies again?

    Beeld is correct in saying that if the Tribunal does not clear the information first then the media is prohibited from a “public interest” defence is 100% correct.

    But they mischievously do not tell anyone that the Tribunal may determine information in public interest thus negating the need for raising a criminal defence of public interest.

    And the second lie is that the “public interest” defence in cases where the information is released without thought is that this cluase is aimed at the whistleblower and NOT THE MEDIA.

    See Boertjie?

    The problem is as always the way in which the sick slithery tabloid like Die Beeld releases information…

  55. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:52 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 1:40 pm:

    Well this law is also only written on a piece of paper.

    Anycase, this sort of action was by large the downfall of the old Apartheid government – ANC might have dug their own grave now.

  56. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 1:59 pm

    Reply to DavidS @ 1:51 pm:

    Beeld is allesbehalwe ‘n tabloid.

    Reply to Morné @ 1:52 pm:
    I think the writing on the wall for the old regime
    was when the US banks stopped lending money and the
    rand dropping.
    According to Pik Botha that was the final shit hitting
    the fan.
    Could be that this came shortly after PW’s
    Rubican speech.

  57. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:02 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 1:59 pm:

    Read this morning that the Rand plunged badly on news of this bill and international investors are very nervous.

    I want to wait and see what happens if the ANC decides to prosecute anyone with this new bill – similar shit will hit the fan – they will be under huge international pressure.

  58. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:07 pm

    Also wanted to mention – back in the day it might have been possible to force this type of law in a country – but with technology today (Facebook, Twitter, etc) there is no effing way the government will be able to stop anonymous whistle blowers (they are not SA institutions). Unless of course they block google, twitter and facebook like China which will never happen.

    Once a story is published on these online mediums, local newspapers and journalists can simply copy and paste these ‘articles’ citing its already in the public domain and not ‘their’ stories.

  59. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:24 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 2:07 pm:

    Wikileaks anyone?

  60. avatar Ollie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:24 pm

    Amazing where a story of 100 pigs can lead to :twisted:

  61. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:25 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 2:24 pm:

    Already being talked about on social media.

  62. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:26 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 2:24 pm:

    Quite ironic!

  63. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:30 pm

    Reply to Morné @ 2:07 pm:

    China and others have closed down certain websites.
    I think Google is also outlawed in China, or then
    at least articles that are critical of the regime
    or favouring Taiwan and Tibet.
    Ditto for Wikipedia.

    You underestimate the power of the ANC
    if you think it can’t eventually happen
    here too. If their gravy train is under
    fire, they will stop at nothing.

    If anybody is of the opinion that it’s only
    the media corps fighting this bill – read here:

    Archbishop Tutu:

    “… it is insulting to be asked to stomach legislation that could be used to outlaw whistle-blowing and
    investigative journalism; that contain no public
    benefit defense clause; and that makes the State
    only answerable to the State.”

    “Please hear the warnings of the academics, civil society
    leaders, labour representatives, media corps, and legal
    and constitutional experts.”

  64. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 2:36 pm

    Reply to Boertjie @ 2:30 pm:

    SA is not China – we do not have the economy to self-sustain – SA can not and will not be able to afford the international community shutting them out – similar to what you mentioned of Pik and the previous regime – in fact, that is what brought about change.

  65. avatar Morné says:
    November 23rd, 2011 at 3:26 pm

    And here is the other side of the coin:

    http://www.news24.com/World/News/Hacking-reporters-made-up-stories-20111123

    British journalists illegally eavesdropped to produce stories that were both intrusive and untrue, a lawyer for several victims of tabloid phone hacking said on Wednesday.

  66. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 3:15 am

    The thing is countries like Canada, Australia and England have governments that are light-years away from RSA in terms of being both accountable and transparent… not too mention have opposition parties with just as much clout as theruling parties only being separated by a few votes…

    RSA has a govt that is morally corrupt, has no accountability, will always have no meaningful opposition due to the hood-winking of the uneducated masses who will vote for them for decades of abuse… and are now using this bill to eradicate transparency under the guise of ‘protecting state secrets’.

  67. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 9:20 am

    Scroll down to the bottom of this classic wikipedia link on the ANC…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=African_National_Congress&oldid=462000422

  68. avatar DavidS says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 9:45 am

    TROLLLLLLLLLLL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Bwahahahahahahahaha!!!!

  69. avatar DavidS says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 9:47 am

    Criticism
    Controversy over corrupt members
    Main article: South African Arms Deal

    The most prominent corruption case involving the ANC relates to a series of ████ ███████ ███████ ███████ ██████ ██████, which resulted in a long term jail sentence to former ████ ████ ████ ████ ████’s legal adviser ████ ███. ████ █████v was released after about two years on the basis that he was ████ ███. He reputedly had high blood pressure. █████ █████ has since been charged by a fellow golfer with assault on a █████ ████. Zuma, now the State president, was charged with ████ ████ ████ ███ in the ████ ████. The charges were subsequently withdrawn by the National Prosecuting Authority of South Africa due to their delay in prosecution. [19] The ANC has also been criticised for its subsequent abolition of the ██████, the multidisciplinary agency that investigated and prosecuted organised crime and corruption, and was heavily involved in the investigation into Zuma and Shaik.

    Other recent corruption issues include the █████ ██████ ███████ ████ ████ municipal manager █████ █████,[20] and the █████ scandal, in which ████ ████ ████ from a state-owned company were allegedly funneled into ███ ████.[21] Links between factions in the ANC, specifically the █████ █████ █████, and ██████ ███ █████ gained media attention following ████ murder in September 2005.

    In December 2007 the ANC elected their new National Executive Committee (NEC), the highest structure in the party. Out of the ███ ████ committee, ██ are (post-apartheid) convicted criminals. Most of these members have been convicted of ████, while one member, ███ ████ ████, was convicted of the ██ ████ ████ █████, ███ ████(1974–1988), also known as █████ █████ (who was also ██████). According to an article in the Mail & Guardian, “by adding those who have been disciplined or moved, and those with dark clouds of unanswered questions hanging over their heads, the figure shifts to ████.”[22]

    The ANC has also been accused of using ███████ and █████ to fight its political battles against ██████ such as the █████ █████. The result has been a number of complaints and allegations that none of the ████ ████ ███ ███ ████ █████the interests of the poor.[23][24] This has resulted in the “███ ███ ██████ █████ Campaign which becomes very prominent each time the country holds elections.[25][26]
    Controversy over wasteful expenditure

    The ANC has ██████ ███████ ████ ████ ████ ██████ ██████[when?] on ████ ███ █████ ███ “█████ expenditure”[27][28][29]

    The main thrust behind this reporting is the official opposition in the country, the Democratic Alliance (DA). They have kept a tally of the expenditure called ‘The Wasteful Expenditure Monitor’[30]

    According to the DA,[31] this waste could have:

    Built 18 574 new RDP houses
    Funded 7775 teachers for a year

  70. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 11:09 am

    Reply to DavidS @ 9:45 am:

    ????

  71. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 11:17 am

    Reply to bryce_in_oz @ 11:09 am:

    I think this was how an ANC article
    was adapted on Wikipedia.

    Reply to bryce_in_oz @ 3:15 am:

    Can’t put it better.
    One high ranking ANC comrade – can’t remember
    his name now – last year said if the masses
    all read newspapers, the ANC will not govern.

  72. avatar DavidS says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 11:57 am

    Bryce

    This was a troll that added that bit

  73. avatar bryce_in_oz says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 1:49 pm

    Reply to DavidS @ 11:57 am:

    If by ‘bit’ you mean on Wikipedia… I know who it was but I’m saying nuffink :wink:

  74. avatar Timeo says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 3:50 pm

    There was a pretty long interview with Zapiro yesterday on public radio over here.

    Seems like the kind of law every dictator should love.

    Best part was the lamentations of the NPR journalist: “But the ANC brought freedom and democracy to South Africa. They are the good guys. How can this be?”

  75. avatar DavidS says:
    November 24th, 2011 at 6:16 pm

    Reply to Timeo @ 3:50 pm:

    Beautiful

    Liberal mindset reasoning at its finest…

    Now they will revert to denial.

  76. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 27th, 2011 at 6:20 pm

    Well, I guess one of the best examples
    for the need of a free press is the
    latest corruption surrounding Mac
    Maharaj (Mail&Guardian, City Press).

    Good example of why the ANC needs
    to muzzle the free press.

    Maharaj goes back a long way:

    During the years prior to his appointment as
    minister, he had been an activist, a detainee, a political prisoner, an exile, an underground commander, and a negotiator.

    He was the main accuser of Bulelani Ngcuka of abuse of power as Director of Public Prosecutions in 2003. This came at the time Ngcuka’s office was investigating him for corruption and fraud during his tenure as the Minister of Transport.

    Due to the nature of the crime he was accused of having committed, First Rand, a division of First National
    Bank, gave him a golden handshake to resign as member of its board, to prevent his presence from having negative impact on business.

  77. avatar Duiwel says:
    November 27th, 2011 at 6:26 pm

    Naand Oudste!

  78. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 27th, 2011 at 7:15 pm

    Reply to Duiwel @ 6:26 pm:

    Jis, jis, jis!
    Hoezit?

  79. avatar Duiwel says:
    November 27th, 2011 at 7:46 pm

    Lekka-lekka,is nou rustig tot die
    12de desember.
    n paar dae se bonie lisensie
    en visvang.
    Hoe is dinge jou kant?

  80. avatar Duiwel says:
    November 27th, 2011 at 7:48 pm

    Weet nie wat is die hoerah oor parys nie.
    kak dorp.
    vuilen vrot bobbejane.
    verkies Rome.

  81. avatar Boertjie says:
    November 27th, 2011 at 8:38 pm

    Reply to Duiwel @ 7:48 pm:

    Sal nie weet van Parys nie -
    klink my die een aan die Vaalrivier
    is beter. Weet nie of dit nog sy
    naam is nie, want die wetters wat
    fkl gebou het eis nou allerhande
    name op vir plekke.

    Sit maar en wag vir die somer, nog net
    die suidoostewind het opgedaag.

    Manne wat weet sê nat jaar vir die
    binneland.
    Miskien spoel die rivier weer skoon
    van al die kak wat onbehandeld in
    hulle beland.

  82. avatar Duiwel says:
    November 28th, 2011 at 1:09 am

    Ja-ja Oudste,
    kyk die ding met die regering,
    sien de beers is goed verkoop.

  83. avatar JT_BOKBEFOK! says:
    November 28th, 2011 at 2:09 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 1:11 pm:

    Hi Ollie, was it a good experience? 2 of my guys are toying with the idea of going to the Sharks Academie but is also quite expensive.

    If your contact is as good let me know and send me the contacts – thanks

  84. avatar JT_BOKBEFOK! says:
    November 28th, 2011 at 2:11 pm

    Reply to Ollie @ 1:21 pm:

    ok – understood.

    Reply to Morné @ 1:19 pm:

    Ok, I’ll also try and contact the doc.

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