Transformation lagging: Mbalula

April 6, 2014
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The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (Sascoc) president Gideon Sam and Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula said athletics, cricket, football, netball and rugby are falling behind with transformation and development.

Source: Sport24

Sam said an Eminent Persons Group (EPG) had been created to monitor the progress of federations.

“On 25 March we received the pilot study on the status of transformation in sport and the findings were shocking,” said Mbalula at a Sascoc general meeting held at Olympic House on Saturday.

“Little has been done to transform and the issue of grassroots transformation and participation of blacks is declining drastically.

“We found poorly maintained infrastructure and a lack of willingness to transform despite the agreement as in the Sports Charter.”

Mbalula then announced far-reaching measures to address the issues at stake.

The quota system as instructed in the national Sports Plan of 2011 will be aggressively implemented said Mbalula.

“We will insist on a change from a 50-50 proportion to a 40-60 representation both provincial and nationally.”

Development plans from the five bodies – athletics, cricket, football, netball and rugby – will be sought according to the minister.

Mbalula warned of harsh punishment if there was any form of resistance to these measures.

If any resistance was met, Mbalula said government could : withdraw funding to bodies that fail to comply; withdraw national colours to federations holding back, rule that utilising bidding and hosting regulations to be illegal, de-register any body that fails to transform and bar sponsorship to anyone hostile to transformation.

Sam, meanwhile, warned there was an air of complacency about South African sport.

“In sport its simply not about you as an individual in the Federation,” said Sam.

“It’s the total commitment to what you are doing and not bailing out when the boat starts leaking.

“When the boat starts sinking then we see the true leaders standing up and I must warn you that we at Sascoc are committed and every day Sascoc CEO, Mr Tubby Reddy, refers to our plan that extends to 2017.”

On the subject of the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Scotland in July and August, Chef de Mission, Patience Shikwambana, said 17 sports codes would be represented by Team South Africa including three that will include Elite Athletes with Disabilities (EAD).

No qualifying events as such will be used for team selection said Shikwambana.

Sascoc would be guided by the International Federations and the Sascoc selection criteria superseded the International Federation’s criteria. “Individual and team athletes must rank in the top five in their events amongst the Commonwealth nations,” said Shikwambana.

“Deadline for final team lists is 31 May and at this early stage, the projected team size is 152 (with 86 male and 66 female competitors).

“At the last games in New Delhi, India, Team South Africa won 33 medals and team management are targeting 36 medals at these Games.”

 

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12 Comments

  1. avatar Duiwel says:
    April 6th, 2014 at 3:30 pm

    Great news!!!
    More Bokke in france:)

  2. avatar Sasori says:
    April 6th, 2014 at 6:39 pm

    These racists wont be satisfied till the teams are 100% black like the soccer team. Why is that, the soccer team is blacker no then under apartheid? And considerably worse too!

    Transformation is just a code word for anti-white.

  3. avatar out wide says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 3:51 am

    While the minister’s intentions might be good, does he have any idea of the unrealistic target he is setting? Do his advisers have the names of 14 players of colour warranting national selection or is this all just pre-election hot air?

    The ruling party has to make a noise about these issues to placate their voters – if only the electorate would judge their government’s performance on real issues such as crime. Most governments would be out after one term in office with such poor protection afforded its citizens but somehow ours is immune from standards applied elsewhere and spends its efforts on focusing on the colour of the players in the national side. Sad really and good luck to Heyneke, he is going to need it.

  4. avatar Morné says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 9:34 am

    Two things.

    In the background we are busy with analysis of the Vodacom Cup specifically. Not only are numbers recorded but the player’s abilities are assessed. This means selections are justified based on ability. Not only that, weaknesses are identified (of players deemed not good enough) and programmes are put in place to improve this.

    In other words, we are actively busy not only trying to record playing numbers but work on weaknesses of players.

    Second thing, out of all the major federations, SARU has shown the best results. Which might be interesting to some.

  5. avatar Aldo says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 10:08 am

    I read what you are saying Morne and no doubt good work is being done. I still wonder though, how much of this failure to transform is SARU’s fault. Forget the other codes mentioned, but how much has really been done to improve ground level interest. That to me is the biggest stumbling block to transformation of sport and we will allways be left bemoaning quotas if that doesnt improve.

    We cannot realistcally expect the Boks to have quotas and be world beaters. But till there is more interest at grassroots that will allways be the problem. Dont think there is a quick fix, but surely there must be money to develop facilities etc, which there are a serious lack of in townships. There are a load of schools without fields, I reckon if that can be improved, the result would be more interest. If the kids have only one sportsfield shared by 2 or 3 schools and that happens to be a rugby field, maybe this will improve interest? I dont know, but that to me is where the ball is being dropped.

  6. avatar Morné says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 10:57 am

    @Aldo:

    Now we can’t – and no we have no power at grass-roots level.

  7. avatar Aldo says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 11:30 am

    Power shouldnt be a factor, more willingness??? Surely no power is needed to build sportfields? Money yes, and their government should maybe step in with SARU. Both have the means IMO, but then I know nothing of the red tape involved.

  8. avatar Mug Punters Organisation of South Africa says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 11:33 am

    errr does face you have been in total political power for 20 years and you have failed transformation, remember cos the buck stops as the top.

    So skipping the populist crap you have failed to transform through governance you have failed to govern.

    This is the only country in the world where there is affirmative action for the majority and you cannot even make that work with a majority government with the mandate to reform so in plain speak that finger your are pointing turn it around and point it at you.

    Like the Stormers no accountability…things happen when you fire people not employ someone to manage the underperforming…the Stormers have rotten management at the top like our government.

  9. avatar Morné says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 11:51 am

    @Aldo:

    Facilities is one thing, the means to run effective programmes to get kids involved, and keep them involved is quite another.

    Our numbers are dropping drastically at school level. There are no programmes to encourage kids (and parents) to become or stay involved in the game. It is those programmes I refer to, and it is something we cannot implement in this sector (or dictate).

    Government has the power to enforce physical education in all schools, this can take on many forms through many different programmes (to get kids up off their asses and get active) with rugby being one of them.

  10. avatar Cheetah Glory says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 1:12 pm

    I see a very easy solution to this:

    CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE

    Louis Botha in Bloemfontein had a clever athletics teacher who scouted the fastest and biggest black okes from the EC. Once at the school the rugby teachers thought: hmmmm, maybe I should let these athletes play rugby?

    Suddenly and against all intentions, there is a rugby school of excellence for black kids in Bloem and results are clear:

    Craven Week, FS youth structures much better represented with black players who learnt the game locally. Having an Oupa Mohoje and a Rhule come through means a great deal to these kids and rugby is suddenly a career aspiration.

  11. avatar Timeo says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 1:21 pm

    @Mug Punters Organisation of South Africa:

    Malaysia has an affirmative action program for the majority ethnic Malays also.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_New_Economic_Policy

  12. avatar out wide says:
    April 8th, 2014 at 6:21 am

    @Timeo: Interesting stuff. When the politicians in SA come out with more racial quotas, the temptation is to think it is only in SA that this happens. However, nowhere do I see mention in wiki made of Malaysia applying quotas to the selection of their sports teams. It seems more that quotas were applied to the usual stuff we are used to like representation in the public service, admission to university etc.

    There are no winners when quotas are applied in the selection of sports sides as was evident in Jake White’s book.

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