O’Donoghue & Deysel to face the music

Super Rugby duo Ed O’Donoghue and Jean Deysel will both face hearings to determine whether they will face further bans after they were sent off in their Rd.14 matches.

Deysel is alleged to have contravened Law 10.4 (b) Stamping or trampling. The incident occurred during the match between the Crusaders and Sharks at AMI Stadium, Addington in Christchurch on Saturday 17 May 2014.

The referee for the match, Rohan Hoffman, issued a red card for the incident which occurred in the 16th minute.

O’Donoghue is alleged to have contravened Law 10.4 (m) Acts contrary to good sportsmanship. The incident occurred during the match between the Reds and Rebels at Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane on Saturday 17 May 2014.

The referee for the match, Steve Walsh, issued a red card for the incident which occurred in the 79th minute.

Both cases will be considered in the first instance by SANZAR Duty Judicial Officer Nicholas Davidson QC.

All SANZAR disciplinary matters are in the first instance referred to a Duty Judicial Officer hearing to provide the option of expediting the judicial process.

For a matter to be dispensed with at this hearing, the person appearing must plead guilty and accept the penalty offered by the DJO.

Source: http://www.superxv.com/

 

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Better known as Bunny, Took over after Pissant went over to the "Dark Side"
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13 Comments on O’Donoghue & Deysel to face the music

  1. Off course if they really wanted to stop dirty play they would crack down more seriously on the source of the problem.

    Cynical foul play – These days, mostly holding back players off the ball. Mostly by Kiwi teams.

    Justin Marshall said from the commentary box the other day that New Zeeland players are coached to hold opponents around the rucks when the referees are not looking.

    Clever and innovative, these Kiwis. By the time the officials cotton on to their latest illegal tactic, they’ll probably have invented a new one already.

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  2. Notice how, now that “not rolling away” is strictly policed, we rarely see players being stomped on at rucks anymore?

    Punishing the perpetrators was only half the solution.

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  3. @Timeo: You are right there and the chief culprits (pun intended) are the Chiefs. Crusaders coach Todd Blackadder went public on the jersey pulling tactics the Chiefs adopt and was roundly criticized for going public on his complaint from everyone in NZ outside Canterbury but hallelujah next game the ref pinged the Chiefs for it.

    All teams appear to be coached in underhand tactics to some degree but I agree with you, some teams (like the Chiefs) adopt them to greater degrees to take advantage of blind referees. Refs need to come down on 2 other curses of modern rugby : the dummy runners clearing out defenders ahead of the runner – it is not gridiron football and even that was penalised for once last weekend plus clearing out of opposition players on the opposition side of the ruck – also surprisingly penalised for once in the Hurricanes v Highlanders game.

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  4. A quirk of the expanded Superugby comp is the fact that teams do not meet all other teams in the comp each year and if Deysel can react so badly to a hold of his leg, it is fortunate for the Sharks that they do not play the Chiefs in the round robin stages of the comp.

    I do not have it in for the Chiefs but I do believe they punch above their weight because they are astutely coached by one of the smartest coaching teams in Rennie-Smith-Coventry. However, some cynical tactics coached in the modern game we could do without.

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  5. Cheating Kiwi teams holding back players at rucks as usual. Why hasnt something being done about this? Apparently this is coached and condoned in new zealand by coaches!! Its cheating you scumbags.

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