Home DHL Western Province WPRFU Vice President Njengele resigns

WPRFU Vice President Njengele resigns

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Vice President of the Western Province Rugby Football Union, Mr Gerald Njengele, handed in his voluntary resignation on Thursday.

The resignation stems from the incident that took place at the HSBC Sevens in Cape Town last December and the internal disciplinary hearings which followed.

WPRFU President, Mr Thelo Wakefield, said that he received Mr Njengele’s resignation on Thursday morning.

“Mr Njengele took the magnanimous decision this morning to resign in acknowledgement of the fact that no one person is greater than the Union and that the name and reputation of WPRFU needs to be held in high esteem at all times.

“We wish to thank Mr Njengele for his valuable contributions to the activities of the WPRFU and wish him well for his future endeavours,” he said.

35 COMMENTS

  1. You fucken apply this to yourself fat Wakefield…

    “Mr Njengele took the magnanimous decision this morning to resign in acknowledgement of the fact that no one person is greater than the Union and that the name and reputation of WPRFU needs to be held in high esteem at all times.”

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  2. On December 7th, 2008, Urban Dictionary[1] user pimpin’817 submitted an entry for “bye felicia,” describing the phrase as a way to bid farewell to someone who is deemed unimportant. On October 27th, 2011, YouTuber Mamclol uploaded a video titled “Bye Felicia,” featuring the clip from Friday with an accompanying hip hop track about the character.

    On January 14th, 2014, Redditor ArsenalZT asked why “bye Felicia” became popular in a post on the /r/OutOfTheLoop[2] subreddit. On August 4th, the phrase was discussed by guest Nicole Richie and host Ryan Seacrest during the radio talk show “On Air with Ryan Seacrest” (shown below).

    In April 2014, American makeup artist and model Jeffree Star posted dismissive tweets accompanied by the hashtag “#byefelicia” (shown below).[4][5] On June 18th, BuzzFeed[3] published a listicle titled “22 Alternative Names to say ‘Bye’ to Instead of Felicia.” According to the Twitter analytics site Topsy,[6] the hashtag #ByeFelicia was tweeted over 35,000 times during the month of August.

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  3. @cab: maybe because of this pearl, which is apparently not racist. ““F**k you white people, f**k the coloureds. I’m a clever darkie, I don’t need your f*****g money”.

    @Timeo: yes it’s got nothing to do with what I mentioned above. He is a poor victim.

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  4. @DavidS:

    “The first person who, having enclosed a plot of land, took it into his head to say this is mine and found people simple enough to believe him was the true founder of civil society. What crimes, wars, murders, what miseries and horrors would the human race have been spared, had some one pulled up the stakes or filled in the ditch and cried out to his fellow men: “Do not listen to this imposter. You are lost if you forget that the fruits of the earth belong to all and the earth to no one!”

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  5. I think you are over reacting a bit.

    Remember that the land you and I live on is stolen property many times over. Whomever gets to claim current ownwership is simply a beneficiary of the most recent theft.
    It does not matter so much though.The land has little value. It’s the fruit of the land that brings value. In your case, the value is in your house, not the plot it is build on. Not owning land does not mean you cannot own a house and not owning a house does not mean you will be homeless.
    Leases and rent.
    I’m sure you’ve heard of it and understand how it works.

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  6. @Timeo: so I’ve paid for something, it gets taken away from me. I should be okay with it, sing kumbaya and go rent? Yeah great, let’s just forget private ownership of anything. I like the ferrari you’re driving. Going to take it for a spin. Sorry, but I liked it and you can always rent another. Like the rolex, I’m just going to take it and sorry, private ownership does not exist.

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  7. @Timeo: Stick your philosophy and pontification from America up your fucken ass. I am dealing with the right here and now reality of the situation. I have a business that runs from a property I own. Without the property no business. I have kids in school, I have a wife, I have to feed them and take care of them and put a roof over their heads. That is being taken away.

    I have a house. I shopped for it. Bought it. Paid for it. Paid taxes on it. Lived in it. Made it nice. Added, changed, increased its value. Now it is going to be taken from me…

    But now I am the one who stole it???

    There used to be a gang of your kind at RAU in the 1980s and 1990s we called the fountain liberals. They’d sit at the fountain and wring their hands and complain bitterly about apartheid… but come to an Afrikaans university. The girls either wore flowy dresses or Doc boots and the guys had long hair and tight jeans and cheese cloth shirts. They would sit there and pontificate and do fuck all. Even n 1993 when COSAS came and sang Nkosi Sikelele and we beat the shit out of the 50 or so who arrived the fountain liberals just sat there and said things like “Do you feel like a man now?” and “What did that accomplish?”

    If we protect our land you’ll probably blame us.

    So fuck off.

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  8. @DavidS:

    Your business and your house is yours. There are no signs yet of ANC plans for taking those away. If there were, I believe you would have every reason to be upset.
    The land on which it operates though are a different story.
    It was stolen. Not by you, but stolen none the less.
    As someone with a law background, you’d be aware of the common legal principle that one cannot legally buy stolen property.

    Every valueable piece of real estate in our world was stolen, often multiple times in the past and most of the time the theft is very well documented. We deal with this contradition with a legal fudge. An arbitrary cut-off date before which thefts is to be disregarded. A treaty. A conquest.
    The fudge always favors the people in power.
    What is happening in South Africa is a new fudge by a new group in power. I don’t discount that this may turn out bad for you, but I very much doubt it will be as bad as the 1910 fudge was for ethnic Africans or how bad the various European fudges were for aboriginal Australians and Americans.

    I also laugthed at the coffin kids in the 80s.
    In the 90s, I realized they were in the right on apartheid.
    Since then, Ive been trying to learn something from past experieces.

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  9. @Aldo:

    Like I explained to Dawie.

    If the Ferrari or the Rolex was stolen at some point in the past, it will be taken away from you and handed back to the rightful owner and neither the state nor the original owner will be expected to compensate your loss.

    You would have to make a civil case against the person you bought it from and if that person cannot be found or cannot pay, you will be out of luck.

    This is a common legal principle.

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  10. @Timeo: so seeing as how I bought my house three years ago, my legal case would be against the same ANC now wanting to take the land my home is on. They signed off on the title deed. You have absolutely no clue if you believe my house does not dissappear if the land it stands on gets taken. Seeing as how the government has promised title deeds to the beneficiaries, I should then what, rent my house?

    The effect of this has been seen and proven in the past. Apparently no lessons have been learnt, as our current government simply repeats the same mistakes.

    Here’s a good article on what happens when populism supercedes rule of law. https://m.news24.com/Columnists/Mondli-Makhanya/just-like-zimbabwe-we-will-rue-the-day-we-chose-populism-over-the-rule-of-law-20180805

    The threat to food security is at an all time high as some of our biggest farmers are not able to plant yet, because they cannot secure loans to farm, due to uncertainty over land expropriation. A farmer I know, needs a loan of R6million to farm and pay workers till crops come in. This is a yearly cycle where he uses his farm as security. Guess what the bank said.

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  11. Your business and your house is yours.
    It’s called BEE…. thanks for playing

    There are no signs yet of ANC plans for taking those away. If there were, I believe you would have every reason to be upset.

    Cyrril Ramaphosa’s speech of 2 August identified urban land as open to expropriation based on the size. I spent money. I have a large house with alarge erf.

    The land on which it operates though are a different story.
    It was stolen. Not by you, but stolen none the less.

    When and by whom and from whom? Nobody. It was not stolen. Not by me and not b any forebear and not from anyone.

    As someone with a law background, you’d be aware of the common legal principle that one cannot legally buy stolen property.

    Not applicable. You need to have an identified owner to do so. There never was in this case. The idea of land being stolen is preposterous.

    Keep making the excuses Timeo… keep making them…

    NIMBY

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